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These People Actually Ate a Shoe

These People Actually Ate a Shoe



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It’s an old cliché: Someone is so poor or hungry that they resort to eating their own shoe. Whether anyone has ever done this to fend off hunger is open to debate, but the concept definitely took off thanks to 1925’s silent comedy The Gold Rush, in which Charlie Chaplin daintily boils, plates, filets, serves, and eats a shoe, even twirling up the laces on his fork like spaghetti (seriously, you should watch the scene if you haven’t, it’s hilarious). But the odds that Chaplin and co-star Mack Swain are actually eating a real shoe are slim to none; it looks a lot more like licorice than leather. Has anyone actually eaten a real shoe? Yes, in fact: These people did.


In 1980, German filmmaker Werner Herzog lost a bet to his friend Errol Morris and ate his own shoe, after cooking it with a little help from none other than chef Alice Waters, at her restaurant Chez Panisse. The whole event was turned into a short film, appropriately titled “Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe.”


This guy, who’s known for eating some dumb things and uploading them to YouTube, bought a fancy shoe, braised it with some vegetables, then proceeded to eat some of it. He doesn’t seem to enjoy the experience.


This YouTube guy boils his shoes and actually manages to choke most of them down. We'd probably advise choosing to eat a leather shoe over a cloth one, though.


A Portland Trailblazers fan named Josh Thatcher made a bet that if guard Damian Lillard didn’t make it to the Western Conference All-Star roster earlier this year, he would eat a shoe. Lillard didn’t make it, so Thatcher bought a child-size shoe at a Goodwill store, boiled it, put it in a blender, and drank it down as part of a smoothie. Alright, then.


Sammy here only manages to eat hot sauce off of a shoe and gnaw on the shoelace, but A for effort, we guess. That shoe looks gross.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


The Food That Fuels Shalane Flanagan

In 2017, Shalane Flanagan became the first American woman in 40 years to win the New York City Marathon. Her secret? Food that&rsquos more than just fuel. In their new cookbook, Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow, nutrition coach Elyse Kopecky and Flanagan share the nourishing and delicious meals that helped her break the tape in Central Park. We asked them to share their top five dishes.

Shalane:
This is one of my favorite recipes of all time. It&rsquos one of the first we tested together in Elyse&rsquos kitchen in Bend, Oregon. I had just been diagnosed with a fracture in my back&mdashI had to pull out of the 2017 Boston Marathon and couldn&rsquot run or train significantly for 10 weeks. I was feeling down, but eating this was uplifting. It was something new and delicious, and I knew immediately that this cookbook was going to be awesome. Working on the book gave me a sense of purpose when I felt a little lost because I couldn&rsquot run.

I love Thai salads, so this is a great healthy version, and even heartier because it&rsquos made with quinoa. In the summer, I love adding a fresh steak from the grill&mdashI&rsquom not picky about the cut, as long as it&rsquos grass-fed beef. This recipe was a staple throughout my training, and I ate it in the week leading up to New York. I knew it had the carbohydrates I needed and would be easy on my stomach, and I try not to change anything I&rsquove done in training before a big race.

Elyse:
A lot of people don&rsquot think to put fresh herbs in a grain salad, but they&rsquore good for digestion and inflammation, and they&rsquove got lots of vitamins and minerals. This recipe features lots of basil and mint, which also add a ton of flavor. And quinoa is the only plant food that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a great food for vegetarians. This salad is gluten-free, and can easily be made vegan, too&mdashjust leave out the fish sauce.

Shalane:
When I&rsquom training really hard, I&rsquom running 130 miles a week for about eight weeks. My immune system can take a heavy hit. This soup gives it a huge boost. Every ingredient has a purpose. Elyse taught me that full-fat coconut milk is antiviral, and curry is great for inflammation. And it has all these veggies: sweet potatoes, chickpeas, kale. It&rsquos just hearty and comforting. During the winter, I was training for Boston in Colorado, and it was cold and windy and snowy. I was running twice a day, and my evening runs were harder to get out for. Having a warm soup to look forward to when I got back made it a little easier. Wherever I&rsquom training, I find a local bakery to get sourdough to go with it.

Elyse:
Soups are an incredible food for runners. They&rsquore more hydrating than plain water because of the sodium and natural electrolytes, and they&rsquore easy to load up with a variety of nutrient-dense veggies. For this soup, sweet potatoes provide an easy-to-digest complex carb, lots of essential electrolytes, and energizing B vitamins. The coconut milk is high in medium-chain fatty acids, which are easy to burn for energy, and it delivers creamy richness without adding dairy, which a lot of runners are sensitive to.

Shalane:
I need a lot of protein in my training. I crave it, and it keeps me full. The convenience and versatility of the meatballs are really appealing. You make a big batch, and have them around. My training is like Groundhog Day&mdash it&rsquos grueling, and it&rsquos pretty much the same thing every day for three months. Having a good variety of food options that aren&rsquot bland and boring is really important to keep the taste buds happy. These are so versatile&mdashyou can even throw them on salads or in rice bowls.

Elyse:
Turkey provides protein that&rsquos easy to digest, plus essential vitamins and minerals for energy production. Many people only think fruits and vegetables provide vitamins, but high-quality meat is nutrient-dense. The cooking method also makes these a good choice for busy runners: Baking them is quick, and you don&rsquot have to brown them first and then constantly watch while they simmer.

Shalane:
I do intense track workouts. Leading up to New York, I was doing mile repeats around 4:40, for up to 12 miles total over the workout. On those days, I would make a big smoothie and have a small portion to go with my oatmeal before my run, and then drink the rest after the workout. After a hard workout like that I&rsquom not super-hungry, but I want a good recovery, and rehydration is especially important. So this smoothie is a great in-between before I sit down for a full meal.

I try to integrate beets into my diet when I&rsquom training hard&mdashscience has shown they may be good for your cardiovascular system because they contain nitrates that help lower blood pressure.

Elyse:
Beets are rich in minerals like potassium, which helps hydration and muscle function. Oats are an easy-to-digest source of complex carbs that provide energy for running. But most importantly, power foods like these are most effective when combined together in the right ratio. For example, we can&rsquot absorb the fat-soluble vitamins in the fruit and veggies without the fat in the yogurt&mdashthat&rsquos why taking a supplement isn&rsquot as effective as eating the real deal.

Shalane:
I crave chocolate and peanut butter quite a bit. And I love to have peanut butter cups midday, after lunch with hot tea&mdashthat&rsquos kind of my ritual. When I&rsquom training hard, I look forward to a sweet treat and this really hits the spot. I only need one or two, and it&rsquos really satisfying. If I&rsquom not racking up a ton of miles, I&rsquoll have these a couple times a week. But when I&rsquom training for a marathon, my taste buds are intensified. These are a mandatory thing, every single day.

Elyse:
Store-bought peanut butter cups are full of sugar and hydrogenated oils&mdashthey&rsquore really bad for you. These are indulgent and rich, but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients, so it&rsquos all whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Having these stashed in my freezer is an awesome way to get all the good fats I need, in one little bite.


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